News

Where to Hang Artworks to Best Effect

signarture burrawang perspex artwork

When you've invested time and money in choosing artworks you love, you'll want to ensure that you hang them where they can be positioned to best advantage. Here are our tips to make the most of your investment.

1. Positioning relative to Room Layout

Step into your home and then into each room with fresh and critical eyes. Artworks create dynamic focal points so you want to position them accordingly

  • where they will be seen on first entering your home and in spaces where they'll be admired when entertaining
  • where you will enjoy them most - from your favourite chair, or perhaps whilst you're propped up in bed

2. Positioning relative to Furniture

Think about their positioning in relation to the furnishings in the room. All but the very largest artworks work best anchored to a piece of furniture

  • centred above a table or sofa, rather than centred to the mid point of a wall
  • but over a long, low credenza or shelving, asymmetrically balanced by other elements and objets d'art
  • or along stretches of open wall, again hang well to the left or right of the midpoint

3. Positioning relative to Other Artworks

Don't make the mistake of hanging artworks at different levels - unless of course you're aiming to create a 'rogue's gallery'. And don't make the all too common mistake of hanging them too high.

  • no matter how big or how small, artworks that share the same wall should share the same centre line - the height at which the centre of the work is placed relative to the floor.
  • this is usually between 150 and 160 cm, or 50' and 63" in imperial terminology, depending somewhat on your own height: the idea being that, at a normal viewing distance, your eye gaze is falls naturally on the mid point of the artwork. 

Of course, whilst the above may be rules of thumb, they're not hard and fast and as with every rule, there are the exceptions that break them.

If you have a very large work, anything over 140cm high, you may well want to hang it lower than you might otherwise, so that it keeps a relationship with the floor. And with larger works, architectural features such as the top of doorways / openings often provide a better anchor to align the top edge of  an artwork.

Sometimes it's best left to the professionals. 

In major capital cities across Australia, we can arrange installation by professional fine art installers at the time of ordering your artwork.

Please just get in contact to arrange.

London Design Festival 2015

Tinted Perspex Art Installation V&A London 2015We love the venerable yet completely contemporary V&A and we love it even more during the annual London Design Festival when it becomes the creative hub of the festival.

Our favourite installation this year would have to be the wonderful 'Mise en Abyme' by designers Laetitia de Allegri and Matteo Fogale which made use of our signarture material: perspex or acrylic glass.

Cut out sheets of various tints of perspex were arranged so as to create a tunnel and designed to distort perspective across the bridge that links the V&A museum's Medieval and Renaissance sculpture galleries.

Stained glass was used a lot during the Renaissance but the designers chose perspex as an alternative to glass because it has the same characteristics and beautiful colours but without the fragility or weight, contrasting with the heavy marble all around.

The irregular openings cut out from each panel gradually become smaller along the route while the tints become darker, exaggerating the perspective when looking through the tunnel formed by the overlapping sheets. The grout lines of tiles lining the bridge further enhance the illusion of exaggerated depth, creating a more immersive experience.

Mise-en-Abyme translates from French as "placed into abyss", and refers to the artistic technique that shows an image containing a smaller copy of itself in a recurring sequence.

A fabulous metaphorical bridging of the Renaissance Period and Contemporary Design through a thoroughly Modern material.